Storage ShedsWhen you’re planning to beautify your storage shed or playhouse, there are few better ways than adding a raised flowerbed. Relatively inexpensive but long on color and texture, even the most basic raised flowerbed adds depth and structure to your backyard or garden landscape.

Building a raised flowerbed is not difficult, but it’s a project that takes careful planning and especially good time management. The right tools and supplies also play a vital role in making sure your new flowerbeds bloom and stay healthy all spring and summer long.

Plan Your Garden Before You Dig

Know your soil and your climate before you decide on which plants you’re going to include in your new flowerbeds. Plants and flowers react differently to different soil types, and your soil’s moisture level will vary according to rainfall and time of year.

Assemble the Right Set of Tools

You’ll need the following tools to build a raised flowerbed:

  1. Can of spray paint – bright orange or red works best
  2. Garden rake
  3. Speed shovel
  4. Weed and grass killer
  5. Leaf rake
  6. Bags of Soil
  7. Flower plants from a nearby nursery or garden center
  8. Knee pads, sunscreen, and old clothes

Tip: Save money by borrowing the tools from friends and family. Just make sure to clean the tools before returning them.

Mark Out the Flowerbed Territory

PlayhousesUsing the spray paint, sketch out the shape and contour you want the flowerbed to follow around your storage shed or playhouse, painting a line in the grass to show its outer edge. It’s a good idea to make a diagram first, to act as a “map” for the flowerbeds’ final shapes. As the old saying goes, “measure twice and cut once.”

After the shape of the flower bed is marked off, spray the weed and grass killer everywhere inside it. This will remove the weeds and grass in a couple of hours. Remember to take all safety precautions described on the product’s label.

Get Digging!

Once the grass and weed killer has done its work, it’s time to dig! Use the shovel to dig around the flower bed’s outer edge, to a depth of about six inches. And don’t waste the dirt you dig – just throw it into the center of the flowerbed.

Add Potting Soil and Conditioner

Mix in potting soil, soil conditioner, and compost with the soil you’ve moved from the flower bed’s edge. Ideally, the finished soil mound will rise several inches and then gradually slope down to the outer edge. Use the leaf rake to pulverize larger clumps of dirt and soil, and get a thick topcoat of potting soil spread evenly throughout and around the storage shed or playhouse.

Plant Your Flowers

Storage ShedsRemove the plants from their transport containers and arrange them according to the directions on their label or name card. Start from the outer edge of the flowerbed and work your way in. Tip: you might have to use your garden rake to bust up stubborn clods of earth and soil.

Dig holes for the plants and bury them only up to the top of the roots (the place closest to the trunk.) Be careful to bury all roots, and to spread the soil evenly around the plant base.

Apply Water And Plant Food

Once all your new flower plants are in place, spray some plant food and make sure your plants are thoroughly watered. The water will help tamp down the new soil and help your roots get started in their new settings.

Make sure to water – but don’t over-water – your flowerbeds frequently. See the plants’ directions for times and schedules.

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