CanopiesThe summer of 2012 isn’t done with us yet! As record temperatures continue bedeviling much of the United States and the rest of the world, the cooler, refreshing temperatures of autumn seem to take longer and longer to arrive.

The blazing heat may have you staying indoors and away from the backyard and patio you’ve worked hard to renovate and enjoy. But the dog days of summer don’t have to keep you penned up. Take some cool relief from the ideas and tips listed below.

Give Your Patio A Shade Sail Cover

Shade Sail CanopiesShade sail canopies combine the functionality of traditional canopies with the versatility of a portable canopy cover. The finished result is a beautiful, elegant canopy that can block most (if not all) of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays while still providing some much needed sun blockage. If you live in an area with a lot of rainfall – those daily showers that only seem to make things steamier – make sure you get a water-permeable canopy. Their specially-constructed fabric allows rainwater to pass through without pooling atop the sail’s surface.

Most sail shade canopies come with installation hardware included, and can be hung over patios, decks, and swimming pools in only minutes.

Cover Your Backyard With a Portable Canopy

CanopiesCreate a shade oasis in your backyard with a portable canopy. Modern portable canopies are easy to set up, block virtually all sunlight and UV rays, and assemble and break down again in minutes. They’re perfect for backyard parties, get-togethers like barbecues and garden parties  - especially wedding receptions and birthday celebrations. They’re also incredibly handy to keep around for everyday use.

Set one up in the middle of your backyard and give yourself a place to rest while completing yardwork, an area to sit while the kids enjoy the backyard, or just a place out of the sun to enjoy some fresh air.

Canopies also come ready to take on a wide array of accessories, too, including anchor kits, weight bags, sidewalls, and headbands.

Stay Fresh And Cool With A Misting System

Misting Tents

Doesn't that look refreshing?

The misting systems that you’ve enjoyed at outdoor festivals, concerts and amusement parks are now readily available to the public. Some even run on city water pressure, meaning there’s no need to buy a pump. Sold with canopy tents or by themselves, misting systems deliver a fresh, refreshing spray of cool water, letting you recharge and relax when the sun gets too hot to handle.

For additional water pressure (meaning additional refreshing power), consider buying a medium- or high-pressure misting tent or misting system.

Screen Out the Heat With A Screened-In Porch

Patio EnclosuresPatio enclosures keep you shaded and protected from mosquitoes, no-see-ums, and other flying pests while remaining easy to install and take down. Their weather-resistant roofs mean they’re ready for years of long life, and you can even match the roof’s color to your house’s paint color or decorative plan. They’re big enough to enclose all of your back porch or deck of just a portion of it.

If your home doesn’t have a back porch, don’t worry. There’s a huge variety of screen houses that give you all the benefits of a screened, enclosed relaxation area but remain freestanding anywhere in your yard. To protect your entire backyard from flying pests, install a mosquito magnet and watch your yard’s flying pest population dwindle to nothing – fast.

Pergolas and Gazebos Are Elegant, Permanent Heat-Stopping Solutions

Pergolas

A cedar pergola

Besides remaining one of the most elegant decorative elements you can give your backyard, the pergola also makes a great frame for shade sail coverings, sun-blocking (and sun-welcoming) vine and liana growth, and as a shelter for your patio furniture and fire pits and outdoor fireplaces. The rugged, handsome pergola frame will beautify any patio, porch, or deck, helping to your home’s comfort (and property value) while helping shield you from direct sunlight.

Of course, you can give your entire backyard a gorgeous new centerpiece by installing a gazebo. Whether built from scratch or from a kit, gazebos bring undeniable ambiance all by themselves or when decorated with flower beds, LED lights, and patio furniture. And they make great places to relax, hang out, and spend time with friends and family.

Use Your Portable Shelter or Garage To Keep Yourself Cool

Canopies

Semi-permanent canopies also make great picnic pavilions.

When you must beat the heat, re-employ the portable or semi-permanent shelter you use to cover boats, vehicles, and other machinery as an oasis. Most modern outdoor canopies and portable garages are built for the long haul against sunlight and severe weather, so they’re more than capable of keeping you and your family cool. They also make perfect temporary coverings for plants and other pets who need some relief from direct sunlight.

Remember too that the transition doesn’t have to be permanent. Just empty out your portable shelter for a day or afternoon, and enjoy its cooling shade all you want before replacing your machinery.

Keep Your House Cool With An Awning

Awnings It’s a sad truth that most people don’t recognize exactly how much direct sunlight affects their home energy bills – especially sunlight that enters through windows and doorways. By installing a retractable or fixed awning, you can block heat uptake that warms your house, while preventing harmful ultraviolet radiation from penetrating window glass and damaging furniture and carpet. There are even awnings specially designed to work with low-overhead doorways, too.

Some modern awnings feature top-flight materials including lightweight aluminum frames and high-endurance acrylic canopy coverings. Many models are also available in dozens of color and style choices.

By the way, remember that protecting yourself from sunburn and other harmful effects stemming from exposure to ultraviolet rays takes more than just a beautiful backyard. Read our guide to preventing sunburns and UV damage elsewhere on this blog.

 

Sunscreen ProtectionEven though for millions of people the lure of the summer sun proves irresistible, the threat of skin damage is never something to take lightly. Enjoying the great outdoors means taking ample precautions, for yourself as well as your family.

When to Avoid The Sun, and When to Cover Up

Skin care experts recommend staying out of direct summertime sunlight between the hours of 10 AM until 4 PM, when the most amount of solar radiation reaches the Earth’s surface. When moving around outside, stay to the shade as much as possible.

Wear sunglasses, not just to shield your eyes from the glare but also to protect your eyelids and eye lenses from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Sunglasses can block as much as 80 percent of harmful rays.

Experts also recommend wearing protective covering, including sleeves, hats, caps and visors to protect as much of the skin as possible. Children and those with very fair-skin are at a higher risk of contracting skin cancer and are encouraged to cover up as much as possible.

Use Sunscreen Early, Use Often

The American Academy of Dermatology and the Skin Cancer Foundation recommend using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. They also recommend using such lotions, sprays, and other formulas frequently and thoroughly – at least every two hours, and even on cloudy days or when standing on sand or pavement or under shade.

Apply the sunscreen to clean skin about 30 minutes before going outdoors, and immediately after swimming or after profuse sweating. Parents should consult a doctor before applying sunscreen to babies aged six months and younger. People with fair skin or a family history of skin problems should use sunscreens with a higher SPF, as should anyone expecting prolonged exposure to the sun or intense exposure (working outside all day, working near reflective surfaces).

Unfortunately, not all sunscreens are created equal. Make sure to use a broadband (or broad-spectrum) variety that protects against both kinds of harmful UV rays: Ultraviolet A (UVA) and Ultraviolet B (UVB).

How Do UVA and UVB Rays Affect the Body?

Shade SailsUltraviolet A rays can penetrate skin tissue, leading to wrinkles and age spots. Ultraviolet B rays burn the skin tissue. Together, UVA and UVB rays can raise the risk of skin tumors.

Exposure to UV radiation has also been linked to premature aging, melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer, cataracts and other eye problems, and even immune system suppression.

Levels of ultraviolet radiation change daily depending on weather patterns and the Earth’s position relative to the sun. The Environmental Protection Agency publishes a UV index that measures the amount of ultraviolet radiation in local areas on a daily basis. Results range from zero (no danger) to 11+. The EPA’s daily results are available at their UV Index Web page.

What Does SPF Mean? What Does It Measure?

SPF measures protection against only UVB rays, and as yet there’s no reliable means of determining UVA blockage. Researchers determine a sunscreen’s SPF by measuring how long it takes treated skin to burn compared to skin that hasn’t used the tested sunscreen.

Keep in mind there’s no universal agreement about how much or how powerful a sunscreen to use. For example, a SPF 60 sunscreen isn’t necessarily twice as good as a SPF 30, depending on your skin sensitivity, how much you use or how often you use it.

Sunscreens also have an expiration date, usually about three years from the time of its manufacture.

Different Sunscreen Forms For Different People

CanopiesCreams, sprays, waxes and powders all work more or less equally well – so long as they boast an adequate SPF. Water-resistant sunscreens will also help retain protection after swimming or sweating.
Doctors recommend creams for patients with dry skin, and that people who are sensitive to skin care products avoid sunscreens that include oxybenzone.

What Are “Inorganic” Sunscreens?

Mineral-based sunscreens, sometimes called “inorganic sunscreens,” use zinc oxide and titanium oxide to protect the skin without penetrating it. These provide an alternative for people with sensitive skin yet remain as effective as other kinds of sunscreens.

Of course, sometimes the best efforts aren’t enough. Watch next week for our guide to treating and dealing with sunburns.